giancarlovolpe:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).Norm

What a great series.  Thanks for posting these!

giancarlovolpe:

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Push it!

Clarity is probably the most important thing to think about at all time when boarding. Pushing your poses to an undeniable level of clarity will improve the clarity of the storytelling in general. Don’t leave space for uncertainty in posing out your characters. Your audience will be more engaged and entertained by the sequence.

This is the last post for the Super Week. I hope you enjoyed it. Back on the regular schedule next week (Every Tuesday).

Norm

What a great series.  Thanks for posting these!

tennyowithaluger:

Have a hard time getting a realistic skin tone palette? You’ll love this!
(source)

tennyowithaluger:

Have a hard time getting a realistic skin tone palette? You’ll love this!

(source)

wishroom:

Bartek Gawel, CDPR’s art director, shares some insight on the importance of head construction for successful character design.

The secret to a good character concept  is its head. Not to brag about the eyes as the mirrors of the soul or the number of emotions a human face can express let’s just get on with it. Because it’s all in the head – believe me.
Any to-be concept artist will have to learn sooner or later how to draw a good face. I decided to take my time and start this little tutorial and share the knowledge, that was gathered by artists and human body experts (scientists to be precise) throughout the ages.
In this episode I’ll write a little bit about the first principal which defines the look and character of the head you are designing. Today I will write about the facial angle.
The most important element you will need while constructing the head is the middle of the ear. This is represented by the red dot on the illustration above.
A line crossing this point and perpendicular to the horizon helps us find the beginning of the neck i.e. the place where the neck meets the chest (point A). Traditional sculptors use a special pendulum  to find the correct line. It’s good if you have an aprentice of any kind to hold it for you, while you’re busy with your work.
The models character is determined by the so called facial angle. This concept was used for the first time in the 18th Century by Petrus Camper, a Dutch anthropologist, scientist and sculptor. He introduced  a constant head position based upon a line drawn from the middle of the ear (red dot)  to the septum (the red line). The second line needed to create the face angle is drawn from the forehead surface with the jaw (yellow line). This angle can have different rays and be even right.
Determining the facial angle allows you to have a base for further head construction and influences the look of the model on an early stage, before you start outlining other elements (e.g. a nose).

[blog post]

wishroom:

Bartek Gawel, CDPR’s art director, shares some insight on the importance of head construction for successful character design.

The secret to a good character concept  is its head. Not to brag about the eyes as the mirrors of the soul or the number of emotions a human face can express let’s just get on with it. Because it’s all in the head – believe me.

Any to-be concept artist will have to learn sooner or later how to draw a good face. I decided to take my time and start this little tutorial and share the knowledge, that was gathered by artists and human body experts (scientists to be precise) throughout the ages.

In this episode I’ll write a little bit about the first principal which defines the look and character of the head you are designing. Today I will write about the facial angle.

The most important element you will need while constructing the head is the middle of the ear. This is represented by the red dot on the illustration above.

A line crossing this point and perpendicular to the horizon helps us find the beginning of the neck i.e. the place where the neck meets the chest (point A). Traditional sculptors use a special pendulum  to find the correct line. It’s good if you have an aprentice of any kind to hold it for you, while you’re busy with your work.

The models character is determined by the so called facial angle. This concept was used for the first time in the 18th Century by Petrus Camper, a Dutch anthropologist, scientist and sculptor. He introduced  a constant head position based upon a line drawn from the middle of the ear (red dot)  to the septum (the red line). The second line needed to create the face angle is drawn from the forehead surface with the jaw (yellow line). This angle can have different rays and be even right.

Determining the facial angle allows you to have a base for further head construction and influences the look of the model on an early stage, before you start outlining other elements (e.g. a nose).

[blog post]

kathaderon:

By request, my vintage copy(s) of Goethe’s Faust. 

Here’s another one.

This version is of unknown date (1920s?), published in Barcelona. The only clue is a Brazilian library stamp, again no date.

Sorry for pic quality, I decided not to scan as the book is rather fragile.

dashawnmahone:

veesdumpingrounds:

tiny tutorial thing I meant to make for the people I sometimes help out on portefolios : ) just wanted to share perspective doesnt have to be a bugger, yknow ? 

For my art bros

pascalcampion:

More (Awesome) tips from the great Grizandnorm.
grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - 2 Basic Storyboarding RulesHere’s 2 tips that are so simple it hurts when I forget them. In the process of re-boarding over and over, they can be lost in the shuffle sometimes. Drill these 2 tips into your head!-Norm

pascalcampion:

More (Awesome) tips from the great Grizandnorm.

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - 2 Basic Storyboarding Rules

Here’s 2 tips that are so simple it hurts when I forget them. In the process of re-boarding over and over, they can be lost in the shuffle sometimes. Drill these 2 tips into your head!

-Norm

fucktonofanatomyreferences:

A mouth-watering fuck-ton of hand references.

[From various sources]

shadowlill:

dommifox:

Much like my leaf tutorial this is another crazy simple guide but it might help a few of you! I love to get a lot of thumbnail type ideas down first before I settle on something final so I like to use this quick method as a way of exploration, basic research into what I’m trying to achieve and a means of creating variety in my work (I hope!) On the flip-side I know a lot of people struggle with creating environments in general, this could be a good way to ease yourself into drawing them without getting too bogged down in details and technicalities, just blasting your ideas down onto a canvas!

i needed this

mintyburps:

I’ve been doing landscapes partially to improve and also for school….the final versions are a little different from these guys but I still really like how they came out. Also revisited a couple of prior speedpaints to clean up as well!

spader7:

we watched the fellowship of the ring and so it called for a boromir (╥_╥)
(really quick and messy)